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Article ID: 694890

NIBIB-Funded Team Designs Rapid Diagnostic System for Debilitating Nutrient Deficiency

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A team of Cornell University engineers and nutritionists with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of NIH, have designed and tested a small, portable diagnostic system that can be used in the field to test blood for vitamin A and iron deficiencies.

Released:
21-May-2018 3:55 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-May-2018 3:45 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    21-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694727

Mice Regrow Neurons and Blood Vessels After Stroke

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In a first-of-its-kind finding, a new stroke-healing gel helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice with stroke-damaged brains

Released:
18-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694819

Age-Related Racial Disparities in Suicide Rates Among Youth Ages 5 to 17 Years

Nationwide Children's Hospital

a new study from researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and collaborators published today in JAMA Pediatrics shows that racial disparities in suicide rates are age-related. Specifically, suicide rates for black children aged 5-12 were roughly two times higher than those of similarly-aged white children.

Released:
18-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 694853

Biology Student Links Clean Air Act to Red Spruce Recovery in Appalachia

West Virginia University

After a 50-year period of declining growth of the tree species prior to the Clean Air Act, a new study found that declining air pollution alongside increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide and warmer spring temperatures have resulted in dramatic forest growth recovery.

Released:
21-May-2018 10:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694810

Gay Male Teens Use Adult Hookup Apps to Find Friends, Partners

Northwestern University

CHICAGO - Although hookup apps require users to be 18 or older, a new Northwestern Medicine study found that more than 50 percent of sexually active gay and bisexual boys ages 14 to 17 met male sexual partners on apps such as Grindr and Scruff. It also was common for these teens to use the apps to connect with friends and find new gay, bisexual and queer friends and boyfriends, which sheds new light on who uses adult male hookup apps and why.

Released:
21-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694848

Public Librarians Address Challenge of Health Literacy in Upcoming Symposium from MLA, PLA and NNLM

Medical Library Association

Press release regarding the Health Information for Public Librarians Symposium.

Released:
19-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694827

Gene Therapy That Restores Vision in Dogs May Help Humans, Too

Michigan State University

— A Michigan State University veterinary ophthalmologist has modified a gene therapy that reverses blindness in dogs that have a certain form of a disease known as progressive retinal atrophy, or PRA, and is now looking to advance the treatment for human use.

Released:
18-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694509

Researchers Operate Lab-Grown Heart Cells by Remote Control

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.

Released:
14-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694530

Cardiomyopathy Mutation Reduces Heart’s Ability to Vary Pumping Force, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Washington State University have discovered how a genetic mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy disrupts the heart’s normal function. The study, which will be published May 18 in the Journal of General Physiology, reveals that the mutation prevents the heart from increasing the amount of force it produces when it needs to pump additional blood around the body.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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