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Article ID: 694842

Researchers Identify Gene That Helps Prevent Brain Disease

University of California San Diego

Scientists have identified a gene that helps prevent the harmful buildup of proteins that can lead to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. As published in Nature, the researchers found that the “Ankrd16” gene acts like a failsafe in proofreading and correcting errors to avoid the abnormal production of improper proteins.

Released:
18-May-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694841

New Algorithm More Accurately Predicts Life Expectancy After Heart Failure

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new algorithm more accurately predicts which people will survive heart failure, and for how long, whether or not they receive a heart transplant. The algorithm would allow doctors to make more personalized assessments of people who are awaiting heart transplants, which in turn could enable health care providers to make better use of limited life-saving resources and potentially reduce health care costs.

Released:
18-May-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694838

Dogs Born in the Summertime More Likely to Suffer Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.

Released:
18-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694648

New Ultrasound Guidelines Reliably Identify Children Who Should be Biopsied for Thyroid Cancer

Loyola University Health System

A Loyola Medicine study has found that new ultrasound guidelines can reliably identify pediatric patients who should be biopsied for thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer is a common cause of cancer in teenagers, and the incidence is increasing. The disease is five times more common in girls than boys.

Released:
15-May-2018 6:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694830

Biotin Supplements Caused Misleading Test Results, Almost Led to an Unnecessary Procedure

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A new case report led by Maya Styner, MD, of the UNC School of Medicine describes how a patient's use of a common over-the-counter biotin supplement caused clinically misleading test results and almost resulted in an unnecessary, invasive medical procedure.

Released:
18-May-2018 2:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694826

Diamond ‘Spin-Off’ Tech Could Lead to Low-Cost Medical Imaging and Drug Discovery Tools

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

An international team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley discovered how to exploit defects in nanoscale and microscale diamonds and potentially enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance systems while eliminating the need for their costly and bulky superconducting magnets.

Released:
18-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
21-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
18-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694509

Researchers Operate Lab-Grown Heart Cells by Remote Control

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.

Released:
14-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
21-May-2018 12:05 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
18-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-May-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Embargo will expire:
23-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
18-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT


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