Feature Channels:

Birds

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Birds

Showing results

110 of 435
Newswise: National Park Service Scientists: Does Aircraft Noise Make Birds More Vocal?
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Dec-2019 12:15 PM EST

National Park Service Scientists: Does Aircraft Noise Make Birds More Vocal?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

National Park Service scientists analyzed nearly 1 million 10-second audio recording samples from national parks across the country and discovered a small increase in bird sound detection when an aircraft sound is also detected. During the 178th ASA Meeting, Kurt Fristrup will present the findings and how human responses to noise might be studied.

Channels: Birds, Scientific Meetings,

Released:
27-Nov-2019 8:35 AM EST

Young tree swallows carry environmental stress into adulthood

Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have found that colder temperatures during tree swallows' development stage has an effect on swallows later in life.

Channels: All Journal News, Birds, Environmental Science, Wildlife,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 12:30 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers Show Noise Pollution Is Threatening the Survival of a Number of Species
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Nov-2019 7:00 PM EST
Released:
19-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Birds of a Feather Flock Together, But How Do They Decide Where to Go?
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST

Birds of a Feather Flock Together, But How Do They Decide Where to Go?

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Coordinated behavior is common in a variety of biological systems, such as insect swarms, fish schools and bacterial colonies. But the way information is spread and decisions are made in such systems is difficult to understand. A group of researchers from Southeast University and China University of Mining and Technology studied the synchronized flight of pigeon flocks. They used this as a basis to explain the mechanisms behind coordinated behavior, in the journal Chaos.

Channels: All Journal News, Birds,

Released:
12-Nov-2019 12:15 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Enter the BirdSpotter Photo Contest

Enter the BirdSpotter Photo Contest

Cornell University

Calling all shutterbug bird lovers: The BirdSpotter Photo Contest is back—always a popular feature of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Project FeederWatch. The contest runs through March 12, with many great prizes available for biweekly winners and final Grand Prize winners. The contest is sponsored by Wild Birds Unlimited.

Channels: All Journal News, Birds, Local - Canada, Local - New York,

Released:
14-Nov-2019 1:15 PM EST
Research Results

Pop Culture

Newswise: Ancient Egyptians Gathered Birds From the Wild for Sacrifice and Mummification
  • Embargo expired:
    13-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST

Ancient Egyptians Gathered Birds From the Wild for Sacrifice and Mummification

PLOS

In ancient Egypt, Sacred Ibises were collected from their natural habitats to be ritually sacrificed, according to a study released November 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sally Wasef of Griffith University, Australia and colleagues.

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, Birds, Religion, Staff Picks, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
6-Nov-2019 4:05 PM EST
Announcement
Newswise: Uncover Secrets of Nesting Birds With “Nest Quest Go!”

Uncover Secrets of Nesting Birds With “Nest Quest Go!”

Cornell University

Secrets hidden in more than 300,000 index cards with hand-written information about nesting birds are gradually being revealed. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is partnering with Zooniverse, an online people-powered research tool, to digitize this valuable collection and create the largest database of nesting bird information in the U.S. This new effort is called "Nest Quest Go!"

Channels: Birds, Environmental Science, Nature,

Released:
13-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Songbirds Sing Species-Specific Songs
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST

Songbirds Sing Species-Specific Songs

PLOS

The generation of species-specific singing in songbirds is associated with species-specific patterns of gene activity in brain regions called song nuclei, according to a study published November 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Kazuhiro Wada of Hokkaido University in Japan, and colleagues.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Birds, Genetics, Wildlife, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
5-Nov-2019 10:05 AM EST
Feature
Newswise: Study Finds Sex Bias in Bird Conservation Plans

Study Finds Sex Bias in Bird Conservation Plans

Cornell University

After pairing up and raising chicks, males and females of some bird species spend their winter break apart. At the end of their journey to Central or South America, you might find mostly males in one habitat, and females in another. Yet conservation strategies have typically overlooked the habitats needed by females, putting already-declining species in even more peril.

Channels: Birds, Environmental Science, Wildlife, All Journal News,

Released:
7-Nov-2019 10:45 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: How hurricanes impact creatures from sea turtles to wild turkeys
Released:
5-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST
Research Results

Showing results

110 of 435

Chat now!
5.10129