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Science

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Enviroment, climate disruption, global warming, reptile eggs, turtles, conservation, wildlife, endangered, , Barrier Reef

Green Sea Turtles Could Face Extinction as Temperatures Rise in Great Barrier Reef

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Science

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Arctic, Marine Life, artificial light, Zooplankton, Marine Science, Climate Change

Shedding Light on Life in the Arctic

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Scientists know that light triggers zooplankton and other marine organisms to move up and down in the water column during normal day and night cycles. Now, an international team of researchers has found that zooplankton are also susceptible to artificial light from research vessels.

Science

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Mahmood Shivji, Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, Guy Harvey Research Institute, Guy Harvey, Nova Southeastern University, Tiger Shark, shark conservation, shark tracking

Tagged Tiger Shark Proving Unstoppable

For more than a decade, researchers at NSU's Guy Harvey Research Institute have been tagging and tracking sharks in order to study their migratory patterns and more. One tiger shark - Andy - is now the longest-ever tracked tiger shark, providing years worth of data for researchers.

Science

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National Science Foundation, Undersea, Wireless Communication, Surveillance Technology, Engineering, autonomous undersea vehicles, Satellites, Oceanographic Research, oceanographic data collection

Researchers to Develop Novel Real-time Undersea Wireless Communications and Surveillance Technology

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Researchers will design, deploy and evaluate a first-of-its-kind software-defined testbed for real-time undersea wireless communications (data, voice, and video streaming) and surveillance.

Science

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Climate Change, oceaonography, Ecology

Parasites and Hosts May Respond Differently to a Warmer World

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Organisms infected by parasites may respond differently to changes in temperature than their uninfected counterparts, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

Science

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Climate Change, fish, Fisheries, Fish Stocks, Commercial Fishing, Environment, Ecology, Marine Biology, Climate Science

Climate Change Drives Collapse in Marine Food Webs

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A new study has found that levels of commercial fish stocks could be harmed as rising sea temperatures affect their source of food.

Science

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University Of Chicago, Geophysics, Paleontology, Biology, Evolution, Mass Extinction, Extinction, Species Diversity

Mass Extinctions Remove Species but Not Ecological Variety

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Though mass extinctions wiped out staggeringly high numbers of species, they barely touched the overall "functional" diversity--how each species makes a living, be it filtering phytoplankton or eating small crustaceans, burrowing or clamping onto rocks. University of Chicago scientists documented this surprising trend in a study on extinctions published Jan. 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Science

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Environment, Pollution, algal blooms, Septic Systems, Waste Water, Microcystis, Red Tides, Green Tides, Brown Tides, Toxins, toxic algae, Ecosystem, Water Treatment, Septic Tank, Indian River Lagoon, St. Lucie Estuary

Study Finds Source of Toxic Green Algal Blooms and the Results Stink

Florida’s St. Lucie Estuary received national attention in 2016 as toxic green algal blooms wreaked havoc on this vital ecosystem. A new study contradicts the widespread misconception that periodic discharges from Lake Okeechobee were responsible. Water samples gathered and tested in the year-long study provide multiple lines of evidence that human wastewater nitrogen from septic systems was a major contributor to the high nitrogen concentrations in the estuary and downstream coastal reefs.

Medicine

Science

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Cancer, Immunotherapies, Marine animals, Bioluminescence, Keck School Of Medicine Of Usc, USC, University Of Southern California, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, Burkitt’s lymphoma, Biomedical And Health Research

Deep Sea Creatures Provide a Guiding Light in the Quest to Develop Cancer-Fighting Therapies

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Scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC use enzymes responsible for marine animal bioluminescence to help researchers test whether cancer immunotherapies work.

Science

Channels:

Metabolites, trigonelline, homarine, signaling chemicals, signaling mechanism, mud crab, Blue Crab, Estuaries, Estuarine research, Marine Aquaculture, Marine Biodiversity, marine signaling, Urine, Metabolomics, Oyster, Fisheries, Fisheries and aquaculture, Pesticides, Herbicide, Marine Ecology

‘Hide or Get Eaten,’ Urine Chemicals Tell Mud Crabs

Mud crabs hide for their lives if blue crabs, which prey upon them, pee anywhere near them. Pinpointing urine compounds for the first time that warn the mud crabs of predatory peril initiates a new level of understanding of how chemicals invisibly regulate undersea wildlife and ecosystems.







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