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Newswise: 209272_web.jpg

Article ID: 717818

127-year-old physics problem solved

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

"Seeing the pictures appear on the computer screen was the best day at work I've ever had," says Simen Ådnøy Ellingsen, an associate professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Energy and Process Engineering.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Origin of Massive Methane Reservoir Identified

Article ID: 717753

Origin of Massive Methane Reservoir Identified

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

New research from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) published Aug. 19, 2019, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science provides evidence of the formation and abundance of abiotic methane—methane formed by chemical reactions that don’t involve organic matter—on Earth and shows how the gases could have a similar origin on other planets and moons, even those no longer home to liquid water. Researchers had long noticed methane released from deep-sea vents. But while the gas is plentiful in the atmosphere where it’s produced by living things, the source of methane at the seafloor was a mystery.

Released:
20-Aug-2019 4:25 PM EDT
Newswise: CITES CoP18 Crucial for Mako Sharks, Guitarfish and Wedgefish

Article ID: 717640

CITES CoP18 Crucial for Mako Sharks, Guitarfish and Wedgefish

Wildlife Conservation Society

Mako sharks, also known as the ‘cheetahs of the sharks,’ are the fastest of all shark species, but they cannot outswim the threat of overfishing in the world’s oceans, say conservation experts from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups who applaud plans by government delegates to increase protection for makos and other sharks and rays fishes at CITES, convening this week in Switzerland.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 11:20 AM EDT
Newswise: UNH Technology Helps Map the Way to Solve Mystery of Pilot Amelia Earhart

Article ID: 717472

UNH Technology Helps Map the Way to Solve Mystery of Pilot Amelia Earhart

University of New Hampshire

Researchers from the University of New Hampshire’s Marine School are part of the crew, led by National Geographic Explorer-at-Large Robert Ballard, that is trying to answer questions about the disappearance of pilot Amelia Earhart. UNH has developed an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV), or robot, that can explore the seafloor in waters that may be too deep for divers.

Released:
14-Aug-2019 1:40 PM EDT
Newswise: 208697_web.jpg

Article ID: 717463

New study reveals unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Research conducted at the University of Hawaiʻi (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) on a marine sponge in Kāneʻohe Bay

Released:
14-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Channels:

All Journal News, Marine Science

Languages:

English

Article ID: 717448

'The Nemo effect' is untrue: Animal movies promote awareness, not harm, say researchers

University of Oxford

The emotive warnings were made because of global reports that its precursor 'Finding Nemo' had inspired a surge in purchases of clown fish, which in turn caused environmental and animal harm. This became known as "the Nemo effect".

Released:
14-Aug-2019 9:45 AM EDT

Channels:

All Journal News, Marine Science, Pets

Languages:

English

Article ID: 717379

Doubling down

University of California, Santa Barbara

Over the recent decade, total human impacts to the world's oceans have, on average, nearly doubled and could double again in the next decade without adequate action. That's according to a new study by researchers from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara.

Released:
13-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Largest-Ever Study of Coral Communities Unlocks Global Solution to Save Reefs

Article ID: 717346

Largest-Ever Study of Coral Communities Unlocks Global Solution to Save Reefs

Wildlife Conservation Society

The largest study ever conducted of its kind has identified where and how to save coral reef communities in the Indo-Pacific, according to an international group of scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other conservation NGOs, government agencies, and universities. The study outlines three viable strategies that can be quickly enacted to help save coral reefs that are threatened by climate change and human impacts.

Released:
12-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 207666_web.jpg

Article ID: 717277

Marine heatwaves a bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, scientists find

University of New South Wales

Marine heatwaves are a much bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, research revealing a previously unrecognized impact of climate change on coral reefs has shown.

Released:
9-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 208349_web.jpg

Article ID: 717265

These sharks glow in the dark thanks to a newly identified kind of marine biofluorescence

City University of New York (CUNY)

In the depths of the sea, certain shark species transform the ocean's blue light into a bright green color that only other sharks can see--but how they biofluoresce has previously been unclear.

Released:
9-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Channels:

All Journal News, Marine Science

Languages:

English


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