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Don Juan Pond, University of Washington, Antarctica, polar science, Hydrology

Salt Pond in Antarctica, Among the Saltiest Waters on Earth, Is Fed From Beneath

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One of the saltiest bodies on Earth, an analog to how water might exist on Mars, shows signs of being one piece of a larger aquifer.

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New Approach to Geoengineering Simulations Is Significant Step Forward

Using a sophisticated computer model, scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a new research approach to geoengineering could potentially be used to limit Earth’s warming to a specific target while reducing some of the risks and concerns identified in past studies, including uneven cooling of the globe.

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Butterflies, Insects, Genetics, Evolution, Mimicry

How a “Flipped” Gene Helped Butterflies Evolve Mimicry

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Scientists from the University of Chicago analyzed genetic data from a group of swallowtail species to find out when and how mimicry first evolved, and what has been driving those changes since then.

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Space, Evolution, Evolution Biology, San Diego

Scientists Find Potential “Missing Link” in Chemistry That Led to Life on Earth

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Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a compound that may have been a crucial factor in the origins of life on Earth.

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Wide Field Camera 3, Asteroids, Hubble Frontier Fields, galaxy cluster Abell 370, parallel field, parallax, archival data

Hubble Sees Nearby Asteroids Photobombing Distant Galaxies

Photobombing asteroids from our solar system have snuck their way into this deep image of the universe taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. These asteroids reside roughly 160 million miles from Earth, yet they’ve horned their way into this picture of thousands of galaxies scattered across space and time at inconceivably farther distances.

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Nature’s Whistles: Rodents Use a Mechanism Like Police Whistle to Produce Ultrasonic Vocalizations

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The anatomy and mechanisms underlying vocal production are often poorly described, especially in small animals, but thanks to new imaging technology, NAU researchers were able to examine the laryngeal structures of small rodents for the first time.

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smart fabric, magnetic fabric, Wearable Computing, wearable tech

How to Store Information in Your Clothes Invisibly, Without

University of Washington computer scientists have created fabrics and fashion accessories that can store data — from security codes to identification tags — without needing any on-board electronics or sensors.

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Tsunami, Tsunami victim, Skull

Aitape Skull Likely Belongs to World’s Oldest Tsunami Victim

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Mark Golitko, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, worked with colleagues from the Field Museum in Chicago and institutes in Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea to study the Aitape skull and the area it was found in.

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University of Vienna, Tetyana Milojevic, Frontiers in Microbiology, MARS, Fingerprints, Faculty of Chemistry, Metallosphaera sedula , archaeon, Metabolism, Microbes, biosignatures, extraterrestrial minerals, microbial activity, astrobiologist , Mars farm, Mars Regolith

Microbes Leave "Fingerprints" on Martian Rocks

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Scientists around Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna are in search of unique biosignatures, which are left on synthetic extraterrestrial minerals by microbial activity. The biochemist and astrobiologist investigates these signatures at her own miniaturized "Mars farm" where she can observe interactions between the archaeon Metallosphaera sedula and Mars-like rocks. These microbes are capable of oxidizing and integrating metals into their metabolism. The original research was currently published in the journal "Frontiers in Microbiology".

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Cosmology, Big Bang, cosmic inflation, Three Dimensional Space, Knot Theory, Quark Gluon, quark gluon plasma

Filling the Early Universe with Knots Can Explain Why the World Is Three-Dimensional

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Filling the universe with knots shortly after it popped into existence 13.8 billion years ago provides a neat explanation for why we inhabit a three-dimensional world. That is the basic idea advanced by an out-of-the-box theory developed by an international team of physicists.







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