Feature Channels:

Digestive Disorders

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Digestive Disorders

Showing results

110 of 1116
Embargo will expire:
25-Sep-2019 5:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
23-Sep-2019 1:30 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Sep-2019 5:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Can Discrete Choice Experiment Technique Predict Real-World Healthcare Decisions?

Article ID: 719099

Can Discrete Choice Experiment Technique Predict Real-World Healthcare Decisions?

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR—the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, announced today the publication of research demonstrating that discrete choice experiments are able to predict real-world healthcare choices.

Released:
23-Sep-2019 3:05 AM EDT
CAP_logo_rgb_PressRelease.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Sep-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 719213

Microbiome: Pathology’s New Frontier

College of American Pathologists (CAP)

Pathologists are increasingly optimistic about the potential of the human microbiome to help guide diagnosis and monitoring of chronic diseases.

Released:
18-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Here's proof that bowel cancer screening reduces deaths

Article ID: 719336

Here's proof that bowel cancer screening reduces deaths

University of South Australia

New research led by the University of South Australia shows just how effective bowel cancer screening is in helping to reduce the number of bowel cancer deaths by up to 45 per cent.

Released:
19-Sep-2019 9:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
25-Sep-2019 8:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Sep-2019 12:05 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Sep-2019 8:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: For gut microbes, not all types of fiber are created equal
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Sep-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 719064

For gut microbes, not all types of fiber are created equal

Washington University in St. Louis

Certain human gut microbes with links to health thrive when fed specific types of ingredients in dietary fibers, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The work — conducted in mice colonized with human gut bacteria and using new technologies for measuring nutrient processing — is a step toward developing more nutritious foods based on a strategy of targeted enrichment of key members of gut microbial communities.

Released:
17-Sep-2019 3:05 AM EDT
BIDMC_Stk_Logo_CMYK_AW_300dpi.jpg

Article ID: 719204

Study: Obesity Associated with Abnormal Bowel Habits – Not Diet

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center demonstrated for the first time that a strong association between obesity and chronic diarrhea is not driven by diet or physical activity. The findings could have important implications for how physicians might approach and treat symptoms of diarrhea in patients with obesity differently.

Released:
18-Sep-2019 12:05 PM EDT
mmc-logo.gif
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Sep-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 719148

Study finds new way to make chemotherapy more effective against pancreatic cancer

Mayo Clinic

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy that most often is resistant to chemotherapy. Researchers have been searching for ways to increase the sensitivity of the tumors to cancer-fighting drugs. A Mayo Clinic-led study published today opens a promising new front in that battle.

Released:
17-Sep-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers ID Compound That Could Play A Novel Role In Halting Pancreatic Cancer Progression

Article ID: 719106

Johns Hopkins Researchers ID Compound That Could Play A Novel Role In Halting Pancreatic Cancer Progression

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In early test tube and mouse studies, investigators at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have found that nonmuscle myosin IIC (MYH14), a protein activated in response to mechanical stress, helps promote metastatic behavior in pancreatic cancer cells, and that the compound 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), known to stiffen myosin IIC-containing cells, can send it into overdrive, overwhelming the ability of cells to invade nearby tissue.

Released:
18-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Showing results

110 of 1116

Chat now!