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Article ID: 697444

Childhood Infections May Have Lasting Effects on School Performance

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Severe infections leading to hospitalizations during childhood are associated with lower school achievement in adolescence, reports a study in the July issue of The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal (PIDJ). The official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases, PIDJ is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
16-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Education

Embargo will expire:
22-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
12-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT

  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jul-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 697245

Hepatitis C Vaccine Could Dramatically Reduce Transmission in People Who Inject Drugs

Loyola University Health System

If a hepatitis C vaccine were successfully developed, it would dramatically reduce transmission of hepatitis C among drug users. even if the vaccine did not provide complete immunity, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine.

Released:
10-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696987

UNC, RTI International Researchers Assess US Travelers’ Knowledge of Zika Virus, Willingness to Take Hypothetical Vaccine

RTI International

A collaboration between researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, RTI International and the UNC School of Medicine has resulted in the first study to assess and compare United States travelers’ knowledge levels about the Zika virus across three regions

Released:
3-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696837

Medical Researchers, Engineers Look to Nanovaccines to Fight Pancreatic Cancer

Iowa State University

A research team led by Iowa State's Balaji Narasimhan and affiliated with the Nanovcaccine Institute based at Iowa State is studying nanovaccines for treating pancreatic cancer. The study is supported by a $2.67 million grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

Released:
28-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696519

How the Flu Virus Builds a Better Mousetrap

Tufts University

For the first time, scientists have directly visualized real-time structural changes in the surface protein of the influenza virus that may help the virus fuse with and enter target cells before hijacking them. Single molecules of the protein were found to stretch toward target cells, then refold and try again 5 to 10 times per second. The discovery may help develop more effective vaccines and better understand other viruses, including Ebola, HIV, and SARS.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696568

Looking to mosquitoes for a way to develop painless microneedles

Ohio State University

A mosquito can insert a needle-like probe into your skin and draw blood for several minutes without you even noticing. Researchers at The Ohio State University believe we can learn from nature’s design of the mosquito to create a painless microneedle for medical purposes.

Released:
25-Jun-2018 10:15 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696056

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 9:40 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696263

Exploring a New Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute are exploring the combination of a new anti-cancer vaccine with an immunotherapy drug approved for use in other forms of cancer to determine if the combined treatment can prompt a patient’s natural defenses (the immune system) to attack their cancer and improve their survival.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696222

Researcher Pursues Updated Vaccine Against Whooping Cough

West Virginia University

To remain effective, the pertussis vaccine must be modified to keep pace with evolving bacteria. As the vaccines' efficacy is declining, Heath Damron, an assistant professor in the WVU School of Medicine, is pursuing innovations to strengthen the vaccine and still keep it safe.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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