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Newswise: In Mice, Alcohol Dependence Results in Brain-Wide Remodeling of Functional Architecture
Released:
14-Jan-2020 4:50 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST

Drinking among sport-playing college students is strongly influenced by peer perceptions

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol misuse among college students remains a major public health concern. Students’ perceptions of how much their peers are drinking, and of peers’ attitudes to alcohol, are known to be a key influence on their own alcohol use. Two distinct types of social norms that can shape students’ drinking are recognized – ‘injunctive’ norms, namely perceptions of peers’ attitudes about how much a college student should drink, and ‘descriptive’ norms, which are perceptions of how much their peers do drink.

Channels: Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Psychology and Psychiatry, Public Health,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST

Beyond the binge: Extreme drinking common among working-age adults

Research Society on Alcoholism

Binge drinking is a common and harmful pattern of alcohol use, often defined as consuming at least four (for women) or five (for men) drinks in one drinking episode. However, some people drink well beyond this, consuming two or even three times the binge threshold, putting them at very high risk of acute harm. Previous research on such ‘high-intensity drinking’, or ‘HID’, has been mostly limited to college-age youth, with less known about HID in the mid-adult age group. A new study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research has evaluated the prevalence, consequences, and influences of HID among Australian adults of working age.

Channels: Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Psychology and Psychiatry,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST

Maturing Out of Alcohol Use in Young Adulthood

Research Society on Alcoholism

Rates of heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder peak in the late adolescent and early adult age-group (19-25 years), before decreasing from around age 26. This supports the notion that many young people ‘mature out’ of heavier drinking behavior. However, changes in young adults’ alcohol consumption vary widely, and depend on a range of factors including role transitions (e.g. marriage, parenthood), social networks, and personality. Dr. Michael Windle from Emory University, Georgia, assessed the variation in ‘maturing out’ by evaluating trajectories of alcohol use from adolescence through young adulthood, up to around 33 years of age. The study, published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, also explored whether different alcohol use trajectories were associated with other indicators of young-adult functioning, relating to health, sleep, and social and occupational functioning.

Channels: Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Psychology and Psychiatry, Sleep,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 8:05 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Research Results
Newswise: Researchers Surprised by High Levels of Alcohol Consumption among Cancer Survivors

Researchers Surprised by High Levels of Alcohol Consumption among Cancer Survivors

National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

New research JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, using data from NHIS to examine self-reported drinking habits among people reporting a cancer diagnosis, finds 56.5% were current drinkers, 34.9% exceeded moderate drinking levels, and 21% engaged in binge drinking.

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Cancer, Healthcare, Public Health, All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 8:45 AM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST

To BOLDly Go (or No-go): Brain imaging predicts frequent binge drinking in adolescents

Research Society on Alcoholism

A study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research could inform efforts to prevent adolescents from escalating to harmful patterns of drinking. Binge drinking in adolescence has many short- and long-term heath consequences, including risk of future alcohol use disorder and potential for harm to the developing brain. The risks are greatest for those who binge frequently – at least once a week. A hallmark of binge drinking is a reduced capacity to control one’s alcohol intake, related to a neurological process of ‘inhibitory control’ involving several regions of the brain. In adolescents who have not yet started drinking, specific alterations in these brain responses have been linked to an increased risk of future alcohol and drug use; however, it was not known if there are changes that could predict escalation of alcohol use among those already drinking. Therefore, researchers from the University of California investigated whether abnormal brain patterns co

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Neuro, Children's Health, All Journal News,

Released:
4-Jan-2020 7:05 AM EST
Research Results
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How MSU helped reduce high-risk drinking among students

Michigan State University

A university-wide social norms marketing campaign has reduced high-risk drinking and adverse outcomes of drinking, according to a new study from Michigan State University in the Journal of American College Health. MSU's social norms campaign was created to educate MSU students about actual drinking behavior on campus. When misperceptions are corrected, behavior will change to be more consistent with the actual norm, said Dennis Martell, director of MSU Health Promotion.

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Back to School, Behavioral Science, Education, All Journal News,

Released:
2-Jan-2020 2:15 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Forensic Chemist Proposes Sweat Testing Strip as Breathalyzer Replacement

Forensic Chemist Proposes Sweat Testing Strip as Breathalyzer Replacement

University at Albany, State University of New York

Jan Halámek and his team of researchers at the University at Albany, led by Department of Chemistry graduate student Mindy Hair, are developing a sensing strip that can detect a person’s blood alcohol content (BAC) based on ethanol levels in a small sweat sample.

Channels: Chemistry, Crime and Forensic Science, All Journal News, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Staff Picks,

Released:
11-Dec-2019 3:10 PM EST
Research Results

Cornell certificate program develops understanding of beer selection

Cornell University

Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration has launched a Beer Essentials certificate program to help hospitality industry professionals develop the end-to-end understanding of beer production, tasting and selection necessary for establishing an effective beer program.

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, Business Ethics, Education, Marketing,

Released:
9-Dec-2019 4:20 PM EST
Research Results


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