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Science

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oil, cooking oil, kitchen safety, Indoor Air Pollution, hot oil, Air Quality, explosive droplets, Cooking, Jeremy Marston, Chao Li, Tadd Truscott, Mohammad Mansoor, Texas Tech University, Utah State University, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

'Explosive' Hot Oil Droplets Could Hurt Your Skin -- and Air Quality

Cooking in a frying pan with oil can quickly become dangerous if “explosive” hot oil droplets jump out of the pan, leading to painful burns. But these droplets may be doing something even more damaging: contributing to indoor air pollution. A group of researchers exploring these “explosive droplets” will present their work to uncover the fluid dynamics behind this phenomenon during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Medicine

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Preemies Activism, Craniofacial Conditions, New Therapy Lessons, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Pediatrics, Pediatric Dermatology, Telemedicine, Dermatology

Parent-Supplied Photos Allow Pediatric Dermatology Diagnoses without an Office Visit in Most Instances

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Using smartphone cameras, parents can reliably take high-quality photographs of their child’s skin condition to send to a dermatologist for diagnosis. This finding suggests that direct-to-patient dermatology can accurately provide pediatric dermatology care.

Medicine

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Eczema, bleach bath, Hygiene, Dermatology, Dermatologic Conditions, dermatologic hygiene

Water Baths as Good as Bleach Baths for Treating Eczema

For patients suffering from eczema (atopic dermatitis), dermatologists will sometimes recommend bleach baths to decrease bacterial infection and reduce symptoms. But a new Northwestern Medicine study found no difference in the effectiveness of a bleach bath compared to regular water baths. In addition, bleach baths can cause stinging and burning of skin, and occasionally even trigger asthma flare-ups in patients.

Medicine

Science

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UTEP, UTEP College of Science, cutaneous leishmaniasis, Biological Sciences, tropical diseases, Parasites, Vaccine, Rosa Maldonado, Ph.D., Igor Almeida, Ph.D.

UTEP Team Advances in Developing Vaccine for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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A research team at The University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing an effective human vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a tropical disease found in Texas and Oklahoma, and affecting some U.S. troops stationed in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Medicine

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American Academy Of Dermatology, Dermatology, Dermatologist, Dermatologists, Dermatology A to Z, Skin Care, scabies, how to prevent scabies, how to treat scabies, scabies contagious, scabies prevention, scabies treatment, how to get rid of scabies, human itch mite, Mites, itch mite

What to Do if You Get Scabies

Scabies is a common skin condition caused by the human itch mite. People get scabies when the mite burrows into the top layer of their skin to live and feed. When the skin reacts to the mite – which is so small that you would need a microscope to see it – an extremely itchy rash develops.

Medicine

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Psoriasis, Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, body surface area

Psoriasis Severity Linked to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

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People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on the severity of the disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found people with psoriasis that covers 10 percent of their body or more are 64 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those without psoriasis, independent of traditional risk factors such as body weight. Applying the study’s findings to the number of people who have psoriasis worldwide would equate to 125,650 new cases of diabetes attributable to psoriasis per year.

Medicine

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Inflamation, Lloyd Miller, Dermatology

How the Skin Becomes Inflamed

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Publishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation.

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Life

Business

Law and Public Policy

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Rural Health, Healthcare, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National 4-H Council, Appalachia, Health Disparities, Racial Disparities, Prevention, Health Policy

Closing the Rural Health Gap: Media Update from RWJF and Partners on Rural Health Disparities

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Rural counties continue to rank lowest among counties across the U.S., in terms of health outcomes. A group of national organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National 4-H Council are leading the way to close the rural health gap.

Medicine

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MD Anderson Cancer Center, Melanoma, liquid biopsy

Circulating Tumor Cells Associated with Relapse in Late-Stage Melanoma Patients

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A study revealing a connection between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and relapse in stage IV melanoma patients points to liquid biopsy as a potential predictor of patients at high risk for disease progression. CTCs, tumor cells shed into the bloodstream or lymphatic system, can lead to additional tumor growth and/or metastasis to distant sites. Findings from the study, led by Anthony Lucci, M.D., professor of Breast Surgical Oncology and Surgical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Center, will be presented at the Nov. 7 annual meeting of the Western Surgical Association.







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