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Article ID: 719275

Decoding how kids get into hacking

Michigan State University

New research from Michigan State University is the first to identify characteristics and gender-specific behaviors in kids that could lead kids to become juvenile hackers.

Released:
19-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 719124

The New Monopolies: Reining in Big Tech

University of Chicago Booth School of Business

The University of Chicago Booth School of Business Stigler Center Committee on Digital Platforms today released its first report delivering eight policy recommendations on how to rein in Big Tech, including creating a new Digital Authority. The independent and non-partisan Committee – composed of more than 30 highly-respected academics, policymakers, and experts – spent more than a year studying in-depth how digital platforms such as Google and Facebook impact our economy and antitrust laws, data protection, the political system and the news media industry.

Released:
17-Sep-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 718979

Invite consumers to pop-up, and pop goes the spending — offline and online

Washington University in St. Louis

Two Washington University in St. Louis researchers along with a former fellow Olin Business School faculty member and Alibaba officials flipped the pop-up business model, and possibly more. Using 799,000-plus consumers as their study participants, the co-authors found that inviting potential customers via text message could increase buying with both a pop-up shop retailer and similar product vendors online... for weeks and months to come.

Released:
13-Sep-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 718391

University of Washington units share three-year NSF grant to make 'internet of things' more secure

University of Washington

Several University of Washington schools and offices will team up to research how organizational practices can affect the interagency collaboration needed to keep the "internet of things" — and institutional systems — safe and secure.

Released:
3-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Newswise: Website Rates Security of Internet-Connected Devices

Article ID: 718332

Website Rates Security of Internet-Connected Devices

Georgia Institute of Technology

If you’re in the market for an internet-connected garage door opener, doorbell, thermostat, security camera, yard irrigation system, slow cooker – or even a box of connected light bulbs – a new website can help you understand the security issues these shiny new devices might bring into your home.

Released:
3-Sep-2019 1:35 AM EDT
Newswise: GW Researchers Develop First of Its Kind Mapping Model to Track How Hate Spreads and Adapts Online

Article ID: 717805

GW Researchers Develop First of Its Kind Mapping Model to Track How Hate Spreads and Adapts Online

George Washington University

Researchers at the George Washington University developed a mapping model, the first of its kind, to track how online hate clusters thrive globally. They believe it could help social media platforms and law enforcement in the battle against hate online.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Newswise: Hackers Could Use Connected Cars to Gridlock Whole Cities

Article ID: 716490

Hackers Could Use Connected Cars to Gridlock Whole Cities

Georgia Institute of Technology

In a future when self-driving and other internet-connected cars share the roads with the rest of us, hackers could not only wreck the occasional vehicle but possibly compound attacks to gridlock whole cities by stalling out a limited percentage of connected cars. Physicists calculated how many stalled cars would cause how much mayhem.

Released:
29-Jul-2019 1:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 713940

Augustana University Professor’s Research Leads to Surprising Mating Decision in Butterfly Species

Augustana University, South Dakota

The males of one species of butterfly are more attracted to females that are active, not necessarily what they look like, according to a recent research conducted at Augustana University.The paper, “Behaviour before beauty: Signal weighting during mate selection in the butterfly Papilio polytes,” found that males of the species noticed the activity levels of potential female mates, not their markings.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT

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