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Archaeology and Anthropology

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Newswise: Cranial deformation as an indicator for cultural membership

Article ID: 717853

Cranial deformation as an indicator for cultural membership

University of Vienna

Led by Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna, Austria and Mario Novak from the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia the study combines bioarchaeological isotopic and ancient DNA methods to analyze the dietary patterns, sex, and genetic affinities of three Migration Period (5th century CE) individuals who were recovered from a pit in the city of Osijek in eastern Croatia. They are associated with the presence of various nomadic people such as the Huns and/or Germanic tribes like the Gepids and Ostrogoths in this part of Europe. The results of the study are published in the recent issue of "PLOS ONE".

Released:
22-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Research Bias May Leave Some Primates at Risk

Article ID: 717431

Research Bias May Leave Some Primates at Risk

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University.

Released:
13-Aug-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Evidence of the 587/586 BCE Babylonian Conquest of Jerusalem Found in Mount Zion Excavation

Article ID: 717348

Evidence of the 587/586 BCE Babylonian Conquest of Jerusalem Found in Mount Zion Excavation

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Researchers digging at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte’s ongoing archaeological excavation on Mount Zion in Jerusalem have announced a second significant discovery from the 2019 season – clear evidence of the Babylonian conquest of the city from 587/586 BCE.

Released:
12-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Recursive Language and Modern Imagination Were Acquired Simultaneously 70,000 Years Ago

Article ID: 717047

Recursive Language and Modern Imagination Were Acquired Simultaneously 70,000 Years Ago

Pensoft Publishers

A genetic mutation that slowed down the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in two or more children may have triggered a cascade of events leading to acquisition of recursive language and modern imagination 70,000 years ago.

Released:
6-Aug-2019 4:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut

Article ID: 716908

Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut

Washington University in St. Louis

A long-term study of western gorillas in Gabon has revealed an unexpected behavior: they use their teeth to crack open and eat nuts. New research by Adam van Casteren, lecturer in biological anthropology in Arts & Sciences, may have important implications for the way researchers predict the diet of human ancestors based on the shape of their teeth.

Released:
4-Aug-2019 6:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 207699_web.jpg

Article ID: 716839

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

The vast cultural and linguistic diversity of Latin American countries is still far from being fully represented by genetic surveys.

Released:
1-Aug-2019 3:05 PM EDT

Arts and Humanities

Newswise: 207295_web.jpg

Article ID: 716624

How humans and chimpanzees travel towards a goal in rainforests

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

The human ranging style is unique among hominoids. The Mbendjele BaYaka people move from camp to camp every few months, and thus have a large lifetime range of approximately 800 square meters.

Released:
30-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: 206967_web.jpg

Article ID: 716329

Pottery related to unknown culture was found in Ecuador

Far Eastern Federal University

Archaeologists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Archeology and Ethnography SB RAS (Russia), Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (ESPOL) (Ecuador)

Released:
24-Jul-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Archaeological Evidence Verifies Long-Doubted Medieval Historical Accounts of First Crusade Conquest

Article ID: 716242

Archaeological Evidence Verifies Long-Doubted Medieval Historical Accounts of First Crusade Conquest

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte-led archaeological dig on Jerusalem’s Mount Zion has been going on for over a decade. This year's findings confirm previously unverified details from nearly thousand-year-old historical accounts of the First Crusade.

Released:
23-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Stone tool changes could reveal how Mesolithic hunter-gatherers responded to changing climate
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jul-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 715637

Stone tool changes could reveal how Mesolithic hunter-gatherers responded to changing climate

PLOS

The development of new hunting projectiles by European hunter-gatherers during the Mesolithic may have been linked to territoriality in a rapidly-changing climate.

Released:
11-Jul-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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