Feature Channels:

Archaeology and Anthropology

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
wau-logo.gif

Green in tooth and claw

Washington University in St. Louis

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors’ diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and potentially for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Oral Health, Scientific Reports,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST
Embargo will expire:
22-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
15-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Research Results
Newswise: xsi9yIwWA-9P0HdEl-h5dRqsI7b9n95JTATy8XIUZ8z6QZ0VX_plfoBZh5jHgV0jSLitL3mhGlNnAmZffBI3T4yJnEi7FzjGi9iawU9VeEAeNpQgw4C4hNRz-enMOYVzzQrwjmU1mcJh_OYl0Aw7jSBXecC9pLYor7Ig30i7mT2ZTl-tgeqDe5iOjl2q_vQHmRZGqiaJR2c7xhJiTVM=s0-
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Neandertals Went Underwater for Their Tools

PLOS

Neandertals collected clam shells and volcanic rock from the beach and coastal waters of Italy during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study published January 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paola Villa of the University of Colorado and colleagues.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Paleontology, Evolution and Darwin, PLOS ONE, Staff Picks,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 12:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 221210_web.jpg

Study puts the 'Carib' in 'Caribbean,' boosting credibility of Columbus' cannibal claims

Florida Museum of Natural History

Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include harrowing descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men - stories long dismissed as myths.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Staff Picks,

Released:
10-Jan-2020 11:30 AM EST
Research Results

Early humans revealed to have engineered optimized stone tools at Olduvai Gorge

University of Kent

Early Stone Age populations living between 1.8 - 1.2 million years ago engineered their stone tools in complex ways to make optimised cutting tools, according to a new study by University of Kent and UCL.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Evolution and Darwin,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 12:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 220746_web.jpg

Over-Hunting Walruses Contributed to the Collapse of Norse Greenland, Study Suggests

University of Cambridge

The mysterious disappearance of Greenland's Norse colonies sometime in the 15th century may have been down to the overexploitation of walrus populations for their tusks, according to a study of medieval artefacts from across Europe.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Marine Science, Environmental Science, Paleontology, Wildlife, Staff Picks,

Released:
6-Jan-2020 2:05 PM EST
Research Results

Researchers learn more about teen-age T.Rex

Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences

Without a doubt, Tyrannosaurus rex is the most famous dinosaur in the world. The 40-foot-long predator with bone crushing teeth inside a five-foot long head are the stuff of legend.

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, Dinosaurs, History, Paleontology, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
2-Jan-2020 12:15 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: ‘Lost crops’ could have fed as many as maize

‘Lost crops’ could have fed as many as maize

Washington University in St. Louis

Make some room in the garden, you storied three sisters: the winter squash, climbing beans and the vegetable we know as corn. Grown together, newly examined “lost crops” could have produced enough seed to feed as many indigenous people as traditionally grown maize, according to new research from Washington University in St.

Channels: Agriculture, Archaeology and Anthropology, Plants, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Dec-2019 3:45 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 220147_web.jpg

New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England

University of Bristol

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the British Museum, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East and Canterbury Archaeological Trust, have, for the first time, identified the use of birch bark tar in medieval England - the use of which was previously thought to be limited to prehistory.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology,

Released:
19-Dec-2019 1:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Earliest known coastal seawall uncovered at Neolithic settlement Tel Hreiz
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Dec-2019 2:00 PM EST

Earliest known coastal seawall uncovered at Neolithic settlement Tel Hreiz

PLOS

Possibly one of the first attempts to protect against sea-level rise in a human settlement is described in a study published December 18, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ehud Galili from the University of Haifa, Israel, and colleagues.

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, Environmental Science, History, Middle East News, Staff Picks, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
11-Dec-2019 3:15 PM EST
Research Results


4.74015