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Article ID: 721128

Did Archaic Genetic Variants Help Melanesians Adapt?

University of Washington School of Medicine

Compared with other world groups, the DNA of Melanesian populations carries some of the largest percentage of ancestry from now-extinct Neanderthals and Denisovans. A genomic study of Melanesians suggests that certain genetic variants inherited from archaic human-like species may have helped these modern people adapt to their tropical island environment.

Released:
21-Oct-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 721069

Archaeologists Uncover 2,000-Year-Old Street in Jerusalem Built by Pontius Pilate

Taylor & Francis

An ancient walkway most likely used by pilgrims as they made their way to worship at the Temple Mount has been uncovered in the "City of David" in the Jerusalem Walls National Park.

Released:
21-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: A Secret in Our Saliva: Food and Germs Helped Humans Evolve Into Unique Member of Great Apes

Article ID: 720881

A Secret in Our Saliva: Food and Germs Helped Humans Evolve Into Unique Member of Great Apes

University at Buffalo

University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet — a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture — has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.

Released:
16-Oct-2019 2:10 PM EDT
Newswise: Rewriting History: Scientists Find Evidence That Early Humans Moved Through the Mediterranean Much Earlier Than Believed
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 720747

Rewriting History: Scientists Find Evidence That Early Humans Moved Through the Mediterranean Much Earlier Than Believed

McMaster University

An international research team led by scientists from McMaster University has unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed.

Released:
15-Oct-2019 9:30 AM EDT
Newswise: Bolivian Forager-Farmers Known for Amazing Heart Health Are Splitting in Beliefs About What Makes a Good Life

Article ID: 720815

Bolivian Forager-Farmers Known for Amazing Heart Health Are Splitting in Beliefs About What Makes a Good Life

Baylor University

A small Bolivian society of indigenous forager-farmers, known for astonishingly healthy cardiovascular systems, is seeing a split in beliefs about what makes a good life. Some are holding more to the traditional — more family ties, hunting and knowledge of forest medicine — but others are starting to favor material wealth, a Baylor University study finds.

Released:
16-Oct-2019 8:30 AM EDT
Newswise: Study “Cures” Oldest Case of Deafness in Human Evolution

Article ID: 720713

Study “Cures” Oldest Case of Deafness in Human Evolution

Binghamton University, State University of New York

An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has published a new study examining a 430,000-year-old cranium of a human ancestor that was previously described as deaf, representing the oldest case of deafness in human prehistory.

Released:
14-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 720608

Private Property, Not Productivity, Precipitated Neolithic Agricultural Revolution

Santa Fe Institute

The Neolithic Agricultural Revolution is one of the most thoroughly-studied episodes in prehistory. But a new paper by Sam Bowles and Jung-Kyoo Choi shows that most explanations for it don’t agree with the evidence, and offers a new interpretation.

Released:
11-Oct-2019 1:25 PM EDT
Newswise: Researcher Brent Seales Using Light Brighter Than the Sun to Read Herculaneum Scrolls

Article ID: 720525

Researcher Brent Seales Using Light Brighter Than the Sun to Read Herculaneum Scrolls

University of Kentucky

For nearly two decades, Brent Seales has doggedly labored to do the impossible — reveal the elusive texts within the carbonized Herculaneum scrolls. Now, he believes new scans are the best chance yet at revealing the mysterious contents.

Released:
10-Oct-2019 12:00 PM EDT
Newswise: Ancient Burial Site Suggests Early Hunter-Gatherers Interacted in Long-Distance Exchange of Objects and Ideas Much Sooner Than Previously Believed

Article ID: 720301

Ancient Burial Site Suggests Early Hunter-Gatherers Interacted in Long-Distance Exchange of Objects and Ideas Much Sooner Than Previously Believed

Binghamton University, State University of New York

A nearly 4,000-year-old burial site found off the coast of Georgia hints at ties between hunter-gatherers on opposite sides of North America, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Hazards Mapping, History and the Future of Rust Belt Cities

Article ID: 720192

Hazards Mapping, History and the Future of Rust Belt Cities

Michigan Technological University

Using geographic information systems (GIS) and archaeology to model industrial hazards in postindustrial cities to guide planning and development.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 8:40 AM EDT

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