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Medicine

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Preemies Activism, Craniofacial Conditions, New Therapy Lessons, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Infectious Disease, zika, Virology, Malaria, Public Health, Birth Defects, Chloroquine, Parasitology, Developmental/Reproductive Biology, Disease In The Developing World, Infectious/Emerging Diseases, preclinical research

Anti-Malaria Drug Shows Promise as Zika Virus Treatment

California researchers have discovered that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective for Zika virus. The drug, called chloroquine, has a long history of safe use during pregnancy, and is relatively inexpensive. The research was published today in Scientific Reports.

Medicine

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Cystic Fibrosis

A New Test to Measure the Effectiveness of CF Drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers have developed a new laboratory model to measure and compare the responses of CF and normal airway cells to CF-related infectious/inflammatory factors.

Medicine

Science

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Cryo Electron Microscopy, cryo-EM, Immune activation

Detailed View of Immune Proteins Could Lead to New Pathogen-Defense Strategies

Biologists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley used cryo-EM to resolve the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens. The researchers captured the high-resolution image of a protein ring, called an inflammasome, as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward.

Medicine

Science

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Ebola, Ebola Virus, omics, Proteomics, Lipidomics, Metabolomics, biomarkers

Unlocking the Secrets of Ebola

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Scientists have identified a set of biomarkers that indicate which patients infected with the Ebola virus are most at risk of dying from the disease. The results come from one of the most in-depth studies ever of blood samples from patients with Ebola.

Medicine

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cryo-EM, Cryo Electron Microscopy, Immune System, Pathogen detection

How the Immune System Identifies Invading Bacteria

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Never-before-seen images of mouse immune system proteins and bacterial bits reveal an inspection strategy that identifies pathogens.

Medicine

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Ebola, Virus, Sierra Leone, Virology, Medicine, Health, Public Health

In the Heart of Devastating Outbreak, Research Team Unlocks Secrets of Ebola

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In a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, published today (Nov. 16, 2017) in Cell Host and Microbe, a scientific team led by the University of Wisconsin–Madison has identified signatures of Ebola virus disease that may aid in future treatment efforts.

Medicine

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University of Vienna, Pavel Kovarik, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), Medical University of Vienna, Queen’s University Belfast, PLoS Pathogens, Natural Killer Cells, Superbug, Klebsiella, Multidrug Resistance, Human Health, Sepsis

Veni Vidi Vici: How Natural Killer Cells Conquer the Superbug Klebsiella

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Multidrug resistance of microbes poses a serious global threat to human health. Such resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae significantly reduce therapeutic options for the treatment of Klebsiella-induced, potentially fatal pneumonia or sepsis. Pavel Kovarik and his team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with colleagues at Queen’s University Belfast now report new insights into how immune cells communicate at the site of infection and join forces in the fight against Klebsiella infections. Their results, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, might be used for the development of alternatives to ineffective anti-microbial drugs.

Medicine

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Malaria, Parasite, Infectious Disease

A Structural Clue to Attacking Malaria’s ‘Achilles Heel’

New research could boost the development of a more potent vaccine against the global killer.

Medicine

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Microbiome, Crohn's Diesease, Gastroenterology, bacterial enzyme

A Clean Slate: Engineering the Gut Microbiome with “Good” Bacteria May Help Treat Crohn’s Disease

Penn Medicine researchers have singled out a bacterial enzyme behind an imbalance in the gut microbiome linked to Crohn’s disease. The new study, published online this week in Science Translational Medicine, suggests that wiping out a significant portion of the bacteria in the gut microbiome, and then re-introducing a certain type of “good” bacteria that lacks this enzyme, known as urease, may be an effective approach to better treat these diseases.







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