Feature Channels:

Evolution and Darwin

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Evolution, Genetics, sexual conflict, Sexual Selection

Duplicate Genes Help Animals Resolve Sexual Conflict

Figure1.jpg

Duplicate copies of a gene shared by male and female fruit flies have evolved to resolve competing demands between the sexes. New genetic analysis by researchers at the University of Chicago describes how these copies have evolved separate male- and female-specific functions that are crucial to reproduction and fertility.

Science

Channels:

Brain, Evolution, Genetics, Birds, Reptiles, Intelligence

Birds and Primates Share Brain Cell Types Linked to Intelligence

In a new study, published this week in the journal Current Biology, scientists from UChicago show that some neurons in bird brains form the same kind of circuitry and have the same molecular signature as cells that enable connectivity between different areas of the mammalian neocortex.

Science

Channels:

Human Evolution, cultural evolution, cultural anthropology, Linguistics, Genetics, Phylogenetics, Computer Science, Psychology, Economics, Biology

Interdisciplinary Approach Yields New Insights Into Human Evolution

Vanderbilt biologist Nicole Creanza takes an interdisciplinary approach to human evolution--both biological and cultural--as editor of special themed issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

Science

Channels:

Nutrition, body size, Allometry, Scaling, mathematical models, largest mammal, Extinction, Ecology, Evolution, Conservation

When It Comes to Extinction Risk, Body Size Matters

pacman_laura_chamblis_studio_yopp-SFI.jpg

Models for extinction risk are necessarily simple. Most reduce complex ecological systems to a linear relationship between resource density and population growth—something that can be broadly applied to infer how much resource loss a species can survive.

Science

Life

Education

Channels:

Avida-ED, Evolution, Science Education, Education, K 12 Education

Online Tool Speeds Up Evolution Education

The biology teacher's pedagogical toolbox is evolving. Bright colors, replicating computer code and a digital petri dish bring evolution science to life for students.

Science

Channels:

Fossils, Fossil, Anthropology, Evolution, Ancestors, Ancient, Prehistoric, modern humans, human fossil, Homo Sapiens, Rolf Quam, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, Misliya Cave, Africa, Jawbone, human migration, Israel, mount carmel, Microct, 3d models, Neandertal, Archaeology

Scientists Discover Oldest Known Modern Human Fossil Outside of Africa

A large international research team, led by Israel Hershkovitz from Tel Aviv University and including Rolf Quam from Binghamton University, State University of New York, has discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa. The finding suggests that modern humans left the continent at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Science

Channels:

Evolution, Horse Anatomy, Equine, Natural History, Fossils, Paleontology

Researchers Pose Revolutionary Theory on Horse Evolution

FigureA.jpg

Scientists have long wondered how the horse evolved from an ancestor with five toes to the animal we know today. While it is largely believed that horses simply evolved with fewer digits, researchers at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) pose a new theory that suggests remnants of all five toes are still present within the hooves of the horse.

Science

Channels:

Alesi, Environment, Science, Evolution, Apes and Human Evolution, Apes, Humans, Geology, Anthropology, Kenya, Africa, Skull, Cranium, Rutgers Geology Museum, Mastodons, Egyptian mummy, Minerals, Rocks, Gems, Fossils, Middle Miocene, Napudet, South Turkana, Nyanzapithecus alesi, Ales, Geology Hall, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, Rutgers, New Jersey, NJ

Meet “Alesi,” a 13-Million-Year-Old Ancestor, at Rutgers Geology Museum This Weekend

AlesiNR18FeibelCraigS0075N1.jpg

About 13 million years ago, a distant ancestor of modern apes and humans suffered an untimely death on the arid landscape of northern Kenya. Last year, a Rutgers scientist helped bring its tiny skull to light, filling in a huge gap in the evolutionary record. And on Saturday, members of the public are invited to come face-to-skull with that ancestor, known as “Alesi,” at the Rutgers Geology Museum’s 50th annual Open House event. The museum stands on the College Avenue Campus of Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Admission is free.

Science

Channels:

A Survival Lesson From Bats – Eating Variety Keeps Species Multiplying

BatDietStudy.JPG

A new study reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more new species in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species.

Science

Channels:

Biodiversity, energy & environmental research, life on Earth, Animal Science, Plant Science, Evolution, Survival

What Species Is Most Fit for Life? All Have an Equal Chance, Scientists Say

elephant1.jpg

There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them — from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria — has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper published Jan. 8 in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, scientists describe the dynamic that began with the origin of life on Earth 4 billion years ago.







Chat now!