Feature Channels:

Evolution and Darwin

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Evolution and Darwin

Showing results

110 of 1218
Newswise: New Species Take Longer to Arise in the Amazon
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 720751

New Species Take Longer to Arise in the Amazon

PLOS

Amazonia is home to the greatest number of species on earth, many now threatened, but a new study published October 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Jason Weir from the University of Toronto and Trevor Price from the University of Chicago hammers home Amazonia’s importance, showing that it is not only a place with many species, but one where it has taken an exceptionally long time for new species to form.

Released:
15-Oct-2019 9:55 AM EDT

Article ID: 721128

Did Archaic Genetic Variants Help Melanesians Adapt?

University of Washington School of Medicine

Compared with other world groups, the DNA of Melanesian populations carries some of the largest percentage of ancestry from now-extinct Neanderthals and Denisovans. A genomic study of Melanesians suggests that certain genetic variants inherited from archaic human-like species may have helped these modern people adapt to their tropical island environment.

Released:
21-Oct-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
23-Oct-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Oct-2019 9:45 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Oct-2019 1:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen

Article ID: 720963

Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen

University of Alberta

Discovery provides valuable insight into evolution of theropod dinosaurs around the world

Released:
17-Oct-2019 2:20 PM EDT
Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife

Article ID: 720960

Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife

University of Cincinnati

Old museum specimens are giving researchers fresh insights into endangered species

Released:
17-Oct-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Oct-2019 3:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720830

Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts

University of Washington

A research team led by the University of Washington has developed a model that could help foresters predict which nonnative insect invasions will be most problematic. This could help managers decide where to allocate resources to avoid widespread tree death.

Released:
16-Oct-2019 5:05 AM EDT
Newswise: A Secret in Our Saliva: Food and Germs Helped Humans Evolve Into Unique Member of Great Apes

Article ID: 720881

A Secret in Our Saliva: Food and Germs Helped Humans Evolve Into Unique Member of Great Apes

University at Buffalo

University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet — a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture — has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.

Released:
16-Oct-2019 2:10 PM EDT

Article ID: 720791

Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously

University of Washington

With the help of new technologies, a team led by the University of Washington has confirmed that piranhas lose and regrow all the teeth on one side of their face multiple times throughout their lives. How they do it may help explain why the fish go to such efforts to replace their teeth.

Released:
15-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Study “Cures” Oldest Case of Deafness in Human Evolution

Article ID: 720713

Study “Cures” Oldest Case of Deafness in Human Evolution

Binghamton University, State University of New York

An international team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has published a new study examining a 430,000-year-old cranium of a human ancestor that was previously described as deaf, representing the oldest case of deafness in human prehistory.

Released:
14-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT
NYUlogoLarge2597.png

Article ID: 720499

Food Comas & Long-Term Memories—New Research Points to an Appetizing Connection

New York University

There may be a connection between food comas—resting after eating—and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes based on its study on brain activity in sea slugs.

Released:
10-Oct-2019 6:05 AM EDT

Showing results

110 of 1218

Chat now!