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Embargo will expire:
25-Sep-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 719118

Brain Imaging Shows How Minimally Verbal and Nonverbal Children with Autism Have Slower Response to Sounds

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP)used state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to determine how nonverbal or minimally verbal children who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) processes auditory stimuli, which could have important diagnostic and prognostic implications across the autism spectrum.

Released:
18-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 718828

Poor Motor Skills Predict Long-Term Language Impairments For Children with Autism, Study Finds

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Fine motor skills – used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing – may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Released:
11-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: 210664_web.jpg

Article ID: 718586

South African study highlights links between low language ability and poor mental health

University of Bath

One of the first studies of its kind focusing on South African children's language ability and mental health outcomes, has found clear evidence for a link between low language ability and depression in young people.

Released:
6-Sep-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 718519

Study shows exposure to multiple languages may make it easier to learn one

University of Washington

A new study from the University of Washington finds that, based on brain activity, people who live in communities where multiple languages are spoken can identify words in yet another language better than those who live in a monolingual environment.

Released:
5-Sep-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 718468

Autism Study Stresses Importance of Communicating with All Infants

University of Texas at Dallas

A new study from a UT Dallas assistant professor affiliated with the Infant Brain Imaging Study network that included infants later diagnosed with autism suggests that all children benefit from exposure to rich speech environments from their caregivers.

Released:
4-Sep-2019 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 718235

Diverse linguistic environment boosts brain sensitivity to new learning, UCI study finds

University of California, Irvine

Numerous studies have noted the brain benefits that come from being bilingual – among them increased executive-level cognitive function and a four- to five-year delay in the risk of developing dementia symptoms.

Released:
29-Aug-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Kids wore video cameras in their preschool class, for science

Article ID: 718171

Kids wore video cameras in their preschool class, for science

Ohio State University

They may all be in the same classroom together, but each child in preschool may have a very different experience, a new study suggests.

Released:
28-Aug-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Education

Article ID: 717953

Study identifies possible genetic link between children's language and mental health

University of York

A new study suggests there may be genetic explanations for why some children with poor language also have poor mental health.

Released:
23-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 717797

VIDEO: Babbling babies’ behavior changes parents’ speech

Cornell University

New research shows baby babbling changes the way parents speak to their infants, suggesting that infants are shaping their own learning environments.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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