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Science

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Chemistry, Biochemistry, Proteins

What Web Browsers and Proteins Have in Common

Researchers in the United States and Germany have just discovered a previously overlooked part of protein molecules that could be key to how proteins interact with each other inside living cells to carry out specialized functions.

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Biochemistry, X Ray, computational model, Telemores, Chromosome, Advanced Photon Source, RNA

WVU Biochemist Goes Online to X-Ray Life-Sustaining Crystals

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Under conventional magnification, the crystals Aaron Robart grows in his West Virginia University lab may look like simple rock salt, but by bombarding them with X-rays, he and his research team can build computational models that reveal the molecules within.

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Chemists Make Playdough/Lego-Like Hybrid to Create Tiny Building Blocks

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Playdough and Legos are among the most popular childhood building blocks. But what could you use if you wanted to create something really small—a structure less than the width of a human hair? It turns out, a team of chemists has found, this can be achieved by creating particles that have both playdough and Lego traits.

Science

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Anthrax, Biological Weapons, Decontamination, Department Of Homeland Security, biological warfare agents, Subway Attack, Bacillus Anthracis

Cleaning Up Subways: Sandia’s 20-Year Mission to Stop Anthrax in Its Tracks

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Sandia National Laboratories engineer Mark Tucker has spent much of the past 20 years thinking about incidents involving chemical or biological warfare agents, and the best ways to clean them up. Tucker’s current project focuses on cleaning up a subway system after the release of a biological warfare agent such as anthrax.

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Life

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Forest Restoration, Old Fish, Electric Eel Insight, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

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Clues on a Successful Vaccine, Tick Saliva, Natural Immune Response, and More in the AIDS and HIV News Source

The latest research, features, and experts on HIV and AIDS.

Medicine

Science

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Biochemistry, Notch, Glycobiology

Sugary Secrets of a Cancer-Related Protein

The proteins in human cells are extensively decorated with different types of sugars, a phenomenon called glycosylation. These modifications greatly increase the diversity of protein structure and function, affecting how proteins fold, how they behave, and where they go in cells. New research that will be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry on Sept. 22 demonstrates that a rare type of glycosylation profoundly affects the function of a protein important for human development and cancer progression.

Medicine

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SIDS, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Serotonin, Brain Chemistry, Pathology, Child Deaths, safe sleep

SIDS Research Confirms Changes in Babies' Brain Chemistry

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University of Adelaide researchers have confirmed that abnormalities in a common brain chemical are linked to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Science

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Chemistry, Materials, Crystallization, MICA, Minerals

New Insights Into Nanocrystal Growth in Liquid

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PNNL researchers have measured the forces that cause certain crystals to assemble, revealing competing factors that researchers might be able to control. The work has a variety of implications in both discovery and applied science. In addition to providing insights into the formation of minerals and semiconductor nanomaterials, it might also help scientists understand soil as it expands and contracts through wetting and drying cycles.

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Chemical Engineering, Sustainability, nuclear waste disposal, nuclear waste management, agricultural runoff, Desalinization, Water Pollution, radioactive waste, Molecular Engineering, Environmental Science, Molecular Design, Pollution, Chemistry, Material Science, material chemistry

Discovery Could Reduce Nuclear Waste with Improved Method to Chemically Engineer Molecules

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A new chemical principle discovered by scientists at Indiana University has the potential to revolutionize the creation of specially engineered molecules whose uses include the reduction of nuclear waste and the extraction of chemical pollutants from water and soil.







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