Curated News:

Staff Picks

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Staff Picks

Showing results

110 of 4637
Embargo will expire:
22-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Aug-2019 4:00 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Embargo will expire:
27-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Aug-2019 4:55 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Amazon Rainforest Absorbing Less Carbon Than Expected

Article ID: 717697

Amazon Rainforest Absorbing Less Carbon Than Expected

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

An international team of scientists, including climate scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, found that accounting for phosphorus-deficient soils reduced projected carbon dioxide uptake by an average of 50% in the Amazon, compared to current estimates based on previous climate models that did not take into account phosphorus deficiency.

Released:
20-Aug-2019 7:05 AM EDT
dh_horz_blue_crop.png
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717522

Alzheimer’s Drug Reverses Brain Damage From Adolescent Alcohol Exposure in Rats

Duke Health

-- A drug used to slow cognitive decline in adults with Alzheimer's disease appears to reverse brain inflammation and neuron damage in rats exposed to alcohol during adolescence.

Released:
15-Aug-2019 11:30 AM EDT
Newswise: City Parks Lift Mood as Much as Christmas, Twitter Study Shows
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 717534

City Parks Lift Mood as Much as Christmas, Twitter Study Shows

University of Vermont

New research shows that visitors to urban parks use happier words and express less negativity on Twitter than before their visit—and that their elevated mood lasts for up to four hours. The effect is so strong that it’s equivalent to the mood spike on Christmas, the happiest day each year on Twitter. With increasing urbanization and mood disorders, this research may have powerful implications for public health and urban planning.

Released:
15-Aug-2019 1:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 717647

Need a Mental Break? Avoid Your Cellphone, Researchers Say

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Using a cellphone to take a break during mentally challenging tasks does not allow the brain to recharge effectively and may result in poorer performance, Rutgers researchers found.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
23-Aug-2019 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Aug-2019 11:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Aug-2019 12:00 AM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

  • Embargo expired:
    19-Aug-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717587

Don’t Miss a Beat: Computer Simulations May Treat Most Common Heart Rhythm Disorder

Johns Hopkins University

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created personalized digital replicas of the upper chambers of the heart and used them to guide the precise treatment of patients suffering from persistent irregular heartbeats. These simulations accurately identified where clinicians need to destroy tissue to restore the heart’s normal rhythm.

Released:
16-Aug-2019 1:45 PM EDT
Newswise: Extreme evolution: Researchers find hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Aug-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717579

Extreme evolution: Researchers find hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders

McMaster University

Researchers at McMaster University who rush in after storms to study the behaviour of spiders have found that extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones may have an evolutionary impact on populations living in storm-prone regions, where aggressive spiders have the best odds of survival.

Released:
16-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Could Duckweed Feed the World?

Article ID: 717605

Could Duckweed Feed the World?

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Climate change is threatening the world’s food supply and the risk of supply disruptions is expected to grow as temperatures rise, according to a new United Nations report co-authored by Rutgers human ecology professor Pamela McElwee. So, how would we feed everyone if the Earth’s population hits 9.7 billion in 2050 as projected? Duckweed, the world’s fastest-growing plant, which has more protein than soybeans and is a traditional food source for people living in parts of Southeast Asia, could be one of the key solutions, according to Eric Lam, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Plant Biology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Showing results

110 of 4637

Chat now!