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Article ID: 698841

Keck Medicine of USC Hospitals Ranked Among the Country’s Best for 10th Year in a Row

Keck Medicine of USC

U.S. News & World Report’s 2018–2019 Best Hospitals rankings place Keck Medicine of USC hospitals among the top 50 nationwide in nine specialties, the top three in Los Angeles and the top seven in California.

Released:
14-Aug-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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    13-Aug-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698835

When it Comes to Regrowing Tails, Neural Stem Cells Are the Key

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

It’s a longstanding mystery why salamanders can perfectly regenerate their tails whereas lizard tails grow back all wrong. By transplanting neural stem cells between species, Pitt researchers have discovered that the lizard’s native stem cells are the primary factor hampering tail regeneration.

Released:
10-Aug-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698897

Hijacking cellular ‘mail’ for regenerative medicine

University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have received approximately $2 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health to develop a better way to regenerate bone or tissues that have been lost to disease or injury.

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13-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698896

Why zebrafish (almost) always have stripes

Ohio State University

A mathematical model helps explain the key role that one pigment cell plays in making sure each stripe on a zebrafish ends up exactly where it belongs.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
14-Aug-2018 9:25 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
13-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 14-Aug-2018 9:25 AM EDT

Embargo will expire:
15-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
13-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698882

Study Reveals Broad ‘Genetic Architectures’ of Traits and Diseases

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 11:55 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698768

Doctor-Patient Discussions Neglect Potential Harms of Lung Cancer Screening, Study Finds

University of North Carolina Health Care System

Although national guidelines advise doctors to discuss the benefits and harms of lung cancer screening with high-risk patients because of a high rate of false positives and other factors, those conversations aren’t happening the way they should be, according to a study by researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 698871

Duke Team Finds Missing Immune Cells That Could Fight Lethal Brain Tumors

Duke Health

Researchers at Duke Cancer Institute have tracked the missing T-cells in glioblastoma patients. They found them in abundance in the bone marrow, locked away and unable to function because of a process the brain stimulates in response to glioblastoma, to other tumors that metastasize in the brain and even to injury.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698818

An Ion Channel Differentiates Newborn and Mature Neurons in the Adult Brain

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Newborn granule cells show high excitability that disappears as the cells mature. Now University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have described key roles for G protein-mediated signaling and the late maturation of an ion channel during the differentiation of granule cells.

Released:
10-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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