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Cell Biology

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Article ID: 717851

Super-powered immune cells – leading the next cancer breakthrough

University of South Australia

Ground-breaking immune therapy promises to deliver vital evidence in the fight against cancer as researchers from the Centre for Cancer Biology open a new clinical trial using genetically engineered immune cells to treat solid cancers.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 11:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Swallowable Device to Detect Pre-cancerous Barrett's Esophagus Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance

Article ID: 717821

Swallowable Device to Detect Pre-cancerous Barrett's Esophagus Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance

Case Western Reserve University

Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center developed the test for early detection of Barrett’s esophagus that offers promise for preventing deaths from esophageal adenocarcinoma. The test involves a novel swallowable balloon device that samples the esophagus and a DNA assay that detects Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancers. In a major step to bringing this technology forward to patients, the balloon device has just received 510K clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. The now FDA-cleared device is being manufactured by Lucid Diagnostics and marketed under the tradename EsoCheck.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
26-Aug-2019 3:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

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Newswise: 209181_web.jpg

Article ID: 717812

Insight into cells' 'self-eating' process could pave the way for new dementia treatments

University of Plymouth

Cells regularly go through a process called autophagy - literally translated as 'self-eating' - which helps to destroy bacteria and viruses after infection.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Why initial UTIs increase susceptibility to further infection

Article ID: 717800

Why initial UTIs increase susceptibility to further infection

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that an initial urinary tract infection (UTI) triggers changes to immune and other cells in the bladder that can prime the bladder to overreact to bacteria, worsening subsequent UTIs.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 717799

UC San Diego Researchers Convert Pro-Tumor Macrophages into Cancer Killers

University of California San Diego Health

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified a new therapeutic approach in mouse models that halts drug resistance and cancer progression by using an antibody that induces the immune system via macrophages to seek and kill cancer cells.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 717738

UGA Researchers Provide First Evidence of Cellular Clocks in Single Cells

University of Georgia

Researchers provide evidence for the first time that individual cells have clocks.

Released:
20-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 717709

Moffitt Researchers Complete Largest Genomic Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma Patients

Moffitt Cancer Center

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive skin tumor that is diagnosed in approximately 2,000 people each year in the United States. Since MCC affects so few people, it is difficult to study the genetic factors that lead to its development and how those factors correlate with response to therapy. However, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have developed the largest descriptive genomic analysis of MCC patients to date, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Their analysis, published in Clinical Cancer Research, will provide important information to improve the care and treatment of MCC patients for many years to come.

Released:
20-Aug-2019 10:30 AM EDT
Embargo will expire:
27-Aug-2019 5:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Aug-2019 8:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Aug-2019 5:00 AM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

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Article ID: 717644

Single Protein Plays Important Dual Transport Roles in the Brain

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Edwin Chapman of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Wisconsin–Madison reports that halting production of synaptotagmin 17 (syt-17) blocks growth of axons. Equally significant, when cells made more syt-17, axon growth accelerated. A wide range of neurological conditions could benefit from the growth of axons, including spinal cord injuries and some neurodegenerative diseases.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 12:00 PM EDT

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