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The One Gene, Menu Labeling, Holiday Food Stress, and More in the Obesity News Source

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

Science

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Plant Sciences, green fuel production, mass spectometry, photosystem II, Cyanobacteria

Water World

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Following the paths of radicals and finding many damaged residues because of incredibly accurate, fast and sensitive mass spectrometry, three Washington University scientists studied the great granddaddy of all photosynthetic organisms — a strain of cyanobacteria — to develop the first experimental map of that organism’s water world.

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Cancer, Immunotherapy, Cancer Immunity

How a Poorly Explored Immune Cell May Impact Cancer Immunity and Immunotherapy

The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body’s invaders can become defective. It’s what allows cancer to develop. So most research has targeted these co-called effector T-cells. But a new study takes a step back and considers: What if the problem isn’t with the effector T-cells but starts higher up the cellular chain?

Medicine

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Genomics, Brain Aneurysm, Amniocentesis, neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, fetal DNA

Genomics Researcher Peters Tackles a Brave New World

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As a young scientist, British researcher David Peters was focused on brain aneurysms as researched through the lens of high-throughput genomics. But when his wife became pregnant with the first of their two children, his world – both as a husband and a scientist – dramatically changed course.

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the Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Breast Cancer, hematology and medical oncology, Research

Novel Therapeutic Target Discovered for Estrogen Receptor Positive (ER+) Breast Cancer

Mount Sinai researchers identify new protein in a common subtype of breast cancer which can potentially offer more effective therapies for the future

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Cryo Electron Microscopy, cryo-EM, Immune activation

Detailed View of Immune Proteins Could Lead to New Pathogen-Defense Strategies

Biologists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley used cryo-EM to resolve the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens. The researchers captured the high-resolution image of a protein ring, called an inflammasome, as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward.

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Ebola, Ebola Virus, omics, Proteomics, Lipidomics, Metabolomics, biomarkers

Unlocking the Secrets of Ebola

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Scientists have identified a set of biomarkers that indicate which patients infected with the Ebola virus are most at risk of dying from the disease. The results come from one of the most in-depth studies ever of blood samples from patients with Ebola.

Medicine

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cryo-EM, Cryo Electron Microscopy, Immune System, Pathogen detection

How the Immune System Identifies Invading Bacteria

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Never-before-seen images of mouse immune system proteins and bacterial bits reveal an inspection strategy that identifies pathogens.

Medicine

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Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Oncogene, Obstetrics, Gynecology, University Hospitals, Cancer Cells, Drugs, epithelial ovarian cancer, Cancer Deaths, Women, DrugPredict, FDA-approved drugs, Aspirin, Nsaids, Ovarian Cancer, drug re-positioning, analisa difeo, rong xu, anil belur nagaraj, Pain Medications

Computer Program Finds New Uses for Old Drugs

Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, matches existing data about FDA-approved drugs to diseases, and predicts potential drug efficacy. In a recent study published in Oncogene, the researchers successfully translated DrugPredict results into the laboratory, and showed common pain medications—like aspirin—can kill patient-derived epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

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Pesticides, Aging, Parkinson Disease, Neurodegeneration

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