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Cognition and Learning

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Article ID: 717797

Babbling babies’ behavior changes parents’ speech

Cornell University

New research shows baby babbling changes the way parents speak to their infants, suggesting that infants are shaping their own learning environments.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    14-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 717424

Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Manganese Could Affect Cognitive Ability and Motor Control in Teens

Mount Sinai Health System

Early-life exposure to the mineral manganese disrupts the way different areas of the brain involved in cognitive ability and motor control connect in teenagers, Mount Sinai researchers report in a study published in PLOS ONE in August.

Released:
13-Aug-2019 4:50 PM EDT
Newswise: Recursive Language and Modern Imagination Were Acquired Simultaneously 70,000 Years Ago

Article ID: 717047

Recursive Language and Modern Imagination Were Acquired Simultaneously 70,000 Years Ago

Pensoft Publishers

A genetic mutation that slowed down the development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in two or more children may have triggered a cascade of events leading to acquisition of recursive language and modern imagination 70,000 years ago.

Released:
6-Aug-2019 4:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Questions During Shared Book Reading with Preschoolers Need to Be More Challenging

Article ID: 717010

Questions During Shared Book Reading with Preschoolers Need to Be More Challenging

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When it comes to challenging young minds to grow language, asking how and why during shared book reading to preschoolers can be more beneficial, according to new research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released:
6-Aug-2019 12:20 PM EDT

Education

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Article ID: 716924

JHU Study Explains How Some Older Brains Decline Before People Realize It

Johns Hopkins University

Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new Johns Hopkins University study could explain why.

Released:
5-Aug-2019 9:50 AM EDT
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Article ID: 716895

Warning to adults: Children notice everything

Ohio State University

Adults are really good at paying attention only to what you tell them to – but children don’t ignore anything. That difference can actually help children do better than adults in some learning situations, a new study suggests.

Released:
5-Aug-2019 7:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Study In Mice Advances Understanding of How Brains Remember Decisions — For Better or Worse

Article ID: 716179

Study In Mice Advances Understanding of How Brains Remember Decisions — For Better or Worse

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Mammal brains — including those of humans — store and recall impressive amounts of information based on our good and bad decisions and interactions in an ever-changing world. Now, in a series of new experiments with mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have added to evidence that such “decision-based” memories are stored in very particular parts of the brain.

Released:
23-Jul-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jul-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 715454

Area of Brain Linked to Spatial Awareness and Planning Also Plays Role in Decision Making

University of Chicago Medical Center

New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 713940

Augustana University Professor’s Research Leads to Surprising Mating Decision in Butterfly Species

Augustana University, South Dakota

The males of one species of butterfly are more attracted to females that are active, not necessarily what they look like, according to a recent research conducted at Augustana University.The paper, “Behaviour before beauty: Signal weighting during mate selection in the butterfly Papilio polytes,” found that males of the species noticed the activity levels of potential female mates, not their markings.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT

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