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Newswise: Scientists enhance color and texture of cultured meat

Article ID: 721207

Scientists enhance color and texture of cultured meat

Tufts University

A team of Tufts University-led researchers exploring the development of cultured meat found that the addition of the iron-carrying protein myoglobin improves the growth, texture and color of bovine muscle grown from cells in culture. This development is a step toward the ultimate goal of growing meat from livestock animal cells for human consumption.

Released:
22-Oct-2019 4:30 PM EDT
Newswise: Making high-value products from agricultural waste

Article ID: 721132

Making high-value products from agricultural waste

University of Adelaide

Sunscreen from mushroom waste, healthy skincare products from apples and berries, and high-tech materials from Brussels sprout stalks – these are some high value products that could be first to market from a new $11 million research consortium led by the University of Adelaide.

Released:
22-Oct-2019 3:05 AM EDT
Newswise: 214390_web.jpg

Article ID: 721071

Real texture for lab-grown meat

Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences

Lab-grown or cultured meat could revolutionize food production, providing a greener, more sustainable, more ethical alternative to large-scale meat production. But getting lab-grown meat from the petri dish to the dinner plate requires solving several major problems

Released:
21-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 721066

Plant physiology will be major contributor to future river flooding, UCI study finds

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 21, 2019 – The next time a river overflows its banks, don’t just blame the rain clouds. Earth system scientists from the University of California, Irvine have identified another culprit: leafy plants. In a study published today in Nature Climate Change, the UCI researchers describe the emerging role of ecophysiology in riparian flooding.

Released:
21-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Steam Technique Can Spell Doom for Citrus Weeds, Help Preserve Environment

Article ID: 721055

Steam Technique Can Spell Doom for Citrus Weeds, Help Preserve Environment

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Like many farmers nationwide, citrus growers are looking for any edge in their fight against weeds, and they’d rather use fewer chemicals to control the plants, says a University of Florida scientist. That’s because chemicals can get into groundwater, surface water and plants themselves.

Released:
21-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Research Results

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Agriculture, All Journal News, Plants,

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English

Newswise: Growers Should Manage Tomato Bacterial Spot While Seedlings are in Transplant Facilities

Article ID: 720986

Growers Should Manage Tomato Bacterial Spot While Seedlings are in Transplant Facilities

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

New findings from University of Florida scientists could help tomato growers nationwide in their battle against a damaging disease.

Released:
18-Oct-2019 8:45 AM EDT

Research Results

Channels:

Agriculture, All Journal News, Environmental Science, Plants,

Languages:

English

Article ID: 720932

Crop-Improvement Lab Established with $25M USAID Grant

Cornell University

Cornell University will lead a new global crop improvement research program to advance plant breeding tools, technologies and methods aimed at delivering staple crops that can increase yields, enhance nutrition and show greater resistance to pests and diseases.

Released:
17-Oct-2019 1:15 PM EDT
Newswise: UK Partners With Bourbon Industry Leaders to Map White Oak Genome

Article ID: 720936

UK Partners With Bourbon Industry Leaders to Map White Oak Genome

University of Kentucky

Bourbon isn’t bourbon without the mighty white oak. Distillers have been aging bourbon in oak barrels as far back as the Roman Empire. Oak barrels give bourbon its unique caramel, vanilla, nutty and toasted flavors. Kentucky distillers rely especially on the white oak. But what if disease hits the species? How would industry professionals protect it? The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is partnering with Maker’s Mark Distillery Inc. in Loretto, Kentucky, and Independent Stave Company to research the DNA of the white oak.

Released:
17-Oct-2019 12:15 PM EDT
Newswise: 214143_web.jpg

Article ID: 720874

How hunger makes food tastier: a neural circuit in the hypothalamus

National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS)

Why does everything taste better when we're hungry? According to new findings from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan, not only does food taste sweeter when our stomachs are rumbling

Released:
16-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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