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Article ID: 694837

Research Suggests Sweet Potatoes Didn't Originate in the Americas

Indiana University

Sweet potatoes may seem as American as Thanksgiving, but scientists have long debated whether their plant family originated in the Old or New World. New research by an Indiana University paleobotanist suggests it originated in Asia, and much earlier than previously known.

Released:
21-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694787

Farm Bill Set for a Vote; SNAP Benefits Already Underestimate Nutritious Diet Costs

Virginia Tech

Released:
18-May-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 694740

UF/IFAS Researchers Hope Better Technology Produces Less Costly Ethanol

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Their goal is to make this form of ethanol less expensively than gasoline and help reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.

Released:
17-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694551

Sustainable Agronomy Conference: Science Meets Practice

American Society of Agronomy (ASA)

The Sustainable Agronomy Conference, sponsored by American Society of Agronomy (ASA) June 26-27, “will bring together the best science and the best practitioners to advance sustainability,” says Gary Pierzynski, ASA president.

Released:
17-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694728

Explaining the History of Australia’s Vegetation

University of Adelaide

University of Adelaide-led research has uncovered the history of when and why the native vegetation that today dominates much of Australia first expanded across the continent.

Released:
17-May-2018 2:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694729

NUS Researchers Lead Effort to Turn Food Scraps Into Green Energy Resource

National University of Singapore

A team lead by researchers from the National University of Singapore has developed a self-sustaining anaerobic digester system that recycles food scraps to produce electrical energy, heat and fertilisers.

Released:
17-May-2018 2:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694691

Enjoy the Great Outdoors This Summer: Maybe Even a Florida Forest

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

“The forests are natural draws for outdoor recreationists looking to see native Florida,” said Taylor Stein, a University of Florida professor of forest resources and conservation. Forests in Florida are home to all kinds of fascinating plants, trees and animals.

Released:
16-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694678

Climate Change Should Help Midwest Corn Production Through 2050

Michigan State University

Contrary to previous analyses, research published by Michigan State University shows that projected changes in temperature and humidity will not lead to greater water use in corn. This means that while changes in temperatures and humidity trend as they have in the past 50 years, crop yields can not only survive – but thrive.

Released:
16-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694672

Less Water, Same Texas Cotton

American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

In Texas, the Southern High Plains uses water from an aquifer to water cotton fields. However, the aquifer is running low. Scientists from the area are working to find the best irrigation method for cotton that uses the least water.

Released:
16-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694645

Economist: Marketing Plans Can Help Central Texas Farmers Capitalize on Grain Markets

Texas A&M AgriLife

The impacts of potential trade tariffs on crops such as soybeans would send ripple effects through other agricultural commodities, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist.

Released:
15-May-2018 4:50 PM EDT
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