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Embargo will expire:
27-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696530

‘Flamingo’: High-Powered Microscopy Coming to a Scientist Near You

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A team at the University of Wisconsin has developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope — an engineering feat that shrinks a tabletop-sized technology down to the weight and dimensions of a suitcase packed for a week’s vacation. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by Morgridge Institute for Research engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 6:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 696358

Police Killings of Unarmed Black Americans Affect Mental Health of Black Community

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Black Americans are nearly three times more likely to be killed by police than their white counterparts, with even larger disparities among those who are unarmed. The trend is also harming the mental health of the black community, according to new research published in The Lancet from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Boston University School of Public Health.

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20-Jun-2018 10:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696488

Ketamine Acts Fast to Treat Depression and Its Effects Last — but How?

University of Illinois at Chicago

In contrast to most antidepressant medications, which can take several weeks to reduce depressive symptoms, ketamine — a commonly used veterinary anesthetic — can lift a person out of a deep depression within minutes of its administration, and its effects can last several weeks. Researchers have long-wondered how ketamine can both act quickly and be so long-lasting.

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21-Jun-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696471

“Antifreeze” Molecules May Stop and Reverse Damage from Brain Injuries

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The key to better treatments for brain injuries and disease may lie in the molecules charged with preventing the clumping of specific proteins associated with cognitive decline and other neurological problems, researchers from the Penn report in a new study published in Neurobiology of Disease.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696220

Waking Up Is Hard to Do: Reversing Deep Unconsciousness

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Michigan Medicine researchers discover that stimulating the prefrontal cortex results in wake-like behavior in anesthetized rats.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 11:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695954

Unusually High Levels of Herpesviruses Found in the Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

Mount Sinai Health System

Two strains of human herpesvirus—human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) —are found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease at levels up to twice as high as in those without Alzheimer’s, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696363

Dying Cancer Cells Make Remaining Glioblastoma Cells More Aggressive and Therapy-Resistant

University of Alabama at Birmingham

A surprising event promotes global changes in glioblastoma. Dying, apoptotic cancer cells release extracellular vesicles that carry components to alter RNA splicing in the recipient glioblastoma cells, and this increases their aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy.

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20-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696451

The Journey of Actinium-225: How Scientists Discovered a New Way to Produce a Rare Medical Radioisotope

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for cancer treatment. Only a few places in the world can produce an extremely limited supply of it. Recently, researchers at the Department of Energy’s national laboratories have collaborated to use particle accelerators to expand this isotope’s availability.

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21-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696439

Alzheimer’s breakthrough: brain metals that may drive disease progression revealed

University of Warwick

Alzheimer’s disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition, by an international research collaboration including the University of Warwick.Dr Joanna Collingwood, from Warwick’s School of Engineering, was part of a research team which characterised iron species associated with the formation of amyloid protein plaques in the human brain – abnormal clusters of proteins in the brain.

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21-Jun-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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