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Medicine

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Magnesium

Both High, Low Levels of Magnesium in Blood Linked to Risk of Dementia

People with both high and low levels of magnesium in their blood may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the September 20, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

Science

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Autism, Wnt genes, Wnt Pathway, Progenitor Cells, Neuroscience

Faulty Cell Signaling Derails Cerebral Cortex Development, Could It Lead to Autism?

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Eva Anton’s lab at UNC has shown how the deletion of the protein APC in progenitor cells – which give rise to neurons – disrupts the Wnt protein pathway, which previously was linked to genes associated with autism.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, APOE, tau, Tauopathy

Newly ID’d Role of Major Alzheimer’s Gene Suggests Possible Therapeutic Target

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A new role has been identified for the major Alzheimer’s risk factor ApoE4, suggesting that targeting the protein may help treat the disease. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis show that ApoE4 exacerbates the brain damage caused by toxic tangles of a different Alzheimer’s-associated protein: tau. In the absence of ApoE, tau tangles did very little harm to brain cells.

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Science

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Sep-2017 12:00 PM EDT

Science

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Brain, Brain Research, Parietal Cortex, Aaron Wilber, GPS

Researcher Sheds New Light on How Brain Operates Like GPS

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Florida State University’s Aaron Wilber, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience, discovers new insights into how the brain is organized to help a person navigate through life.

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Robert Froemke, Dan Littman, Pew, Nyu Langone

Two NYU School of Medicine Researchers Awarded New Pew Research Prizes

A research team at NYU School of Medicine and its Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine is one of six from across the United States to receive newly established innovation funds from the Pew Charitable Trusts’ biomedical programs.

Medicine

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Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Depression, Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Serotonin, Ssris, Research & Development, Pharmaceucticals, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, National Institutes Of Health (NIH), Mental Illness

Research Provides Clues to Treat Depression, Autism and Other Neuropsychiatric Disorders

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Alterations in a naturally occurring chemical in the brain called serotonin have been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety and autism. Researchers are revealing critical insights into the mechanisms that can drive diminished serotonin signaling during development and in adulthood to provide new ways of treating several widespread neuropsychiatric disorders associated with perturbed serotonin signaling.

Medicine

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Psychiatry, Aging, Neurobiology, Wisdom Scale, Gerontology

Researchers Develop New Tool to Assess Individual’s Level of Wisdom

Researchers at University of San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new tool called the San Diego Wisdom Scale (SD-WISE) to assess an individual’s level of wisdom, based upon a conceptualization of wisdom as a trait with a neurobiological as well as psychosocial basis.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Depression, Moods, Mathematics

Study Suggests You Can ‘Pick Up’ a Good or Bad Mood From Your Friends

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New research suggests that both good and bad moods can be ‘picked up’ from friends, but depression can’t. A team led by the University of Warwick has examined whether friends’ moods can affect an individual therefore implying that moods may spread across friendship networks.

Medicine

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Cancer, Breast Cancer, Cognition, Psychiatry, Behavior, Exercise, Physical Activity

Brain Powered: Increased Physical Activity Among Breast Cancer Survivors Boosts Cognition

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It is estimated that up to 75 percent of breast cancer survivors experience problems with cognitive difficulties following treatments, perhaps lasting years. Currently, few science-based options are available to help. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report in a pilot study of 87 female breast cancer survivors that an increase in physical activity more than doubled the women’s post-treatment mental processing speed.







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