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Science

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Climate Change, oceaonography, Ecology

Parasites and Hosts May Respond Differently to a Warmer World

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Organisms infected by parasites may respond differently to changes in temperature than their uninfected counterparts, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

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Biodiversity, energy & environmental research, life on Earth, Animal Science, Plant Science, Evolution, Survival

What Species Is Most Fit for Life? All Have an Equal Chance, Scientists Say

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There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them — from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria — has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper published Jan. 8 in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, scientists describe the dynamic that began with the origin of life on Earth 4 billion years ago.

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Life

Law and Public Policy

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Conservation in Colombia, Leaping Larvae, Electric Sense in Sharks, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Science

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coral reef conservation, Climate Change, coral migration

Coral Immigrants Provide Hope for Reefs Facing Climate Change

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New models identify factors that put coral reefs at risk of extinction in the face of climate change, and suggest that facilitating migration of corals could allow reefs to adapt. The results of this research will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA on January 7, 2018.

Science

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larval insects, Larval Development, Jumping

Leaping Larvae: Developing Flies Jump Without Legs

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New research characterizes jumping behavior in larval midge flies. Even though these larvae are typically restrained during development, they can use a unique physiological mechanism to jump long distances. These results will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA.

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Scientists Seek Diagnostic Tool for Harmful Algal Blooms

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With a three-year $681,343 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a team of Ohio State scientists plans to develop a widely applicable system for assessing watershed health and determining when a crisis is looming.

Science

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Archaeology, Archeology, Fossils, life on Earth, Geology, Microbiology, Earth, Earth Science

Oldest Fossils Ever Found Show Life on Earth Began Before 3.5 Billion Years Ago

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Researchers at UCLA and the University of Wisconsin–Madison have confirmed that microscopic fossils discovered in a nearly 3.5 billion-year-old piece of rock in Western Australia are the oldest fossils ever found and indeed the earliest direct evidence of life on Earth.

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Data Analysis, Weather And Joint Pain, Medicare records

That Feeling in Your Bones

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Rainy weather has long been blamed for achy joints and back pain. Past research has yielded mixed results. New analysis tracking visits to the doctor with daily rainfall found no relationship between the two.

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Three Rare Black-Necked Storks Hatch in Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary

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The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Ministry of Environment (MoE) announced today that after five weeks of active nest protection by community members, three Black-necked stork chicks have hatched in Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary (KPWS) in the Northern Plains of Cambodia, giving hope to the future conservation of this rare species in the country.

Medicine

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marine and freshwater biology, Marine Science, marine algae, sea sponge, crab, Animal Behavior

Deck the Claws

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Majoid crabs — known as decorator crabs — adorn themselves with items secured from their surroundings such as sponges, algae and other marine debris. Scientists and students at the University of Delaware are exploring what factors drive this behavior.







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